Microplastic Spectral Libraries

SLoPP and SLoPP-E: Raman Spectral Libraries for Microplastics Research

To increase the accessibility of methods for characterizing microparticles via Raman spectroscopy, we created two spectral libraries that are representative of microplastics found in environmental samples. Here, we present SLoPP, a spectral library of plastic particles, consisting of 148 reference spectra, including a diversity of polymer types, colors, and morphologies. To account for the effects of aging on microplastics and associated changes to Raman spectra, we present a spectral library of plastic particles aged in the environment (SLoPP-E). SLoPP-E includes 113 spectra, including a diversity of types, colors, and morphologies. The microplastics used to make SLoPP-E include environmental samples obtained across a range of matrices, geographies, and time. Our libraries increase the likelihood of spectral matching for a broad range of microplastics because our libraries include plastics containing a range of additives and pigments that are not generally included in commercial libraries. These tools were developed to improve the accessibility of microplastics research in response to a growing and multidisciplinary field, as well as to enhance data quality and consistency.

 Library curated by: Keenan MunnoϮ, Hannah De Frond, Bridget O’Donnell and Chelsea Rochman 

Questions? Contact: keenan.munno@mail.utoronto.ca 

Download these files if you are using WITec’s TrueMatch database and want to use SLoPP and SLoPP-E.


FLOPP and FLOPP-e: ATR-FTIR Spectral Libraries for Microplastics Research

We present two novel databases specific to microplastics using attenuated total reflection (μATR-FTIR): (1) an FTIR library of plastic particles (FLOPP), containing 186 spectra from common plastic items, across 14 polymer types and (2) an FTIR library of plastic particles sourced from the environment (FLOPP-e), containing 195 spectra across 15 polymer types. Both libraries include particles from a variety of sources, morphologies, and colors. We demonstrate the applicability of these libraries for microplastics research by comparing spectral match results from two microplastic datasets. For this, we use different combinations of libraries including: commercially available reference libraries, an open-access polymer library, and FLOPP and FLOPP-e. Among tests, the greatest mean HQI result was achieved when the greatest number of libraries was included. This work demonstrates that spectral libraries specific to plastic particles found in the environment improve the accuracy of spectral matching and are best used in combination with commercial libraries containing chemical components that are commonly found within plastics and other anthropogenic particles. Multivariate principal component analyses of FLOPP and FLOPP-e spectra confirmed differences among polymer types and higher variation in principal component scores among weathered particles, but no patterns were observed among particle colors or morphologies. These results demonstrate that ATR-FTIR analyses are sensitive to weathering of plastics but not to particle color and morphology.

 Library curated by: Hannah De Frond, Ronald Rubinovitz and Chelsea Rochman 

We would like to thank Thermo Fisher Scientific, and specifically Ronald Rubinovitz, Matt Cerutti and Erik Haddadine, for providing the Rochman Lab with the instrumentation and technical support that allowed the creation of this work.

Questions? Contact: hannahdefrond@gmail.com or chelsea.rochman@utoronto.ca

Download the FLOPP and FLOPP-e Libraries

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